scienceisbeauty

scienceisbeauty:

The promising development of Compact Fusion at Lockheed Martin - Skunk Works.

More, elsewhere:

spacetravelco

spacetravelco:

The First Lady Astronaut Trainees / Mercury 13

"The men go off and fight the wars and fly the airplanes and come back and help design and build and test them. The fact that women are not in this field is a fact of our social order."

- John Glenn of the Mercury 7, testifying before a House subcommittee in 1962

"The women underwent the identical tests that the male candidates had undergone. In the end, 68% of the women passed with ‘no medical reservations’ compared to 56% of the men. The 13 females who passed were known as the Mercury 13. They were Bernice ‘Bea’ Steadman, Janey Hart, Geraldine ‘Jerri’ Sloan Truhill, Rhea Allison Woltman, Sarah Lee Gorelick Ratley, Jan Dietrich, Marion Dietrich, Myrtle Cagle, Irene Leverton, Gene Nora Jessen, Jean Hixson, Wally Funk and Geraldyn ‘Jerrie’ Cobb…

Cobb had tested in the top 2% of all tested candidates, male and female.”

The Lovelace Woman in Space Program (1960-1962)

The discovery of a particle about three times as hefty as a proton may lead to insights into the force that holds the nucleus of an atom together.

The dauntingly named D*s3 (2860)ˉ is a never-before-seen particle recently observed by the LHCb detector at the Large Hadron Collider, the world’s most powerful particle accelerator, near Geneva. Like protons and neutrons, D*s3 (2860)ˉ is made up of fundamental units of matter called quarks. But the new particle’s two quark components — a strange quark and the antimatter partner of a charm quark — are heavier than those in most other particles, making the particle an ideal target for studying the nuclear strong force that binds the two quarks.

Despite its incredible strength compared with the universe’s three other forces (weak, electromagnetic and gravity), the strong force is difficult to study because it acts over very short distances.

The discovery is detailed in the Oct. 17 Physical Review Letters and the Oct. 1 Physical Review D.

emergentfutures
emergentfutures:

A TINY LEGO FLUID LAB BUILT WITH 3D PRINTING

When you need to manipulate and direct fluids in small volumes, microfluidic systems are the technology of choice.
Used by engineers, chemists and biotechnologists in applications from enzymatic and DNA analysis to the detection of pathogens to clinical diagnostic testing and synthetic chemistry, the tiny systems once required a clean room to create and thousands of dollars to manufacture. They also required numerous iterations to achieve the required complexity.

Sometimes called a “Lab-on-a-Chip,” the systems are now, through the work of USC researcher Krisna Bhargava, designed as 3D printable sets of building blocks which researchers can clip together in hours. The 1cc blocks can accomplish LOC functions like routing, mixing or analysis in three-dimensions. The researchers say a large share of the success in the fabrication process came as a result of recent advancements in high-resolution, 3D printing.
Full Story: 3Dprinterworld

emergentfutures:

A TINY LEGO FLUID LAB BUILT WITH 3D PRINTING

When you need to manipulate and direct fluids in small volumes, microfluidic systems are the technology of choice.

Used by engineers, chemists and biotechnologists in applications from enzymatic and DNA analysis to the detection of pathogens to clinical diagnostic testing and synthetic chemistry, the tiny systems once required a clean room to create and thousands of dollars to manufacture. They also required numerous iterations to achieve the required complexity.

Sometimes called a “Lab-on-a-Chip,” the systems are now, through the work of USC researcher Krisna Bhargava, designed as 3D printable sets of building blocks which researchers can clip together in hours. The 1cc blocks can accomplish LOC functions like routing, mixing or analysis in three-dimensions. The researchers say a large share of the success in the fabrication process came as a result of recent advancements in high-resolution, 3D printing.

Full Story: 3Dprinterworld

The new term started and Statistical Mechanics  has been my first course for this year. Before we dive into percolation the introduction is about fractals, which are beautiful things.

According to Wolfram MathWorld :

A fractal is an object or quantity that displays self-similarity, in a somewhat technical sense, on all scales. The object need not exhibit exactly the same structure at all scales, but the same “type” of structures must appear on all scales. A plot of the quantity on a log-log graph versus scale then gives a straight line, whose slope is said to be the fractal dimension. The prototypical example for a fractal is the length of a coastline measured with different length rulers. The shorter the ruler, the longer the length measured, a paradox known as the coastline paradox.

The pictures above show a more complicated structure and a simpler one which is known as the Siempinski gasket.

If you are interested about statistical mechanics, I am very fortunate to have an amazing lecturer this year who has written a textbook called Complexity and Criticality (Imperial College Press Advanced Physics Texts).

Read More:

http://mathworld.wolfram.com/SierpinskiSieve.html

http://mathworld.wolfram.com/Fractal.html

startswithabang

startswithabang:

There are no free quarks

"But in the strong force, if you have a single color charge all by itself, the force it generates gets stronger and stronger the farther you are away from it, and only drops to zero when you’re very close! If you ever had a free quark, even temporarily, even if it was only “free” for a very small distance around it, it would require a huge amount of energy to create, and it would immediately begin pulling particle-antiparticle pairs out of the vacuum until everything was colorless again."

If you want an electron to be free, all you have to do is put in enough energy to ionize an atom. If you want a mass to be free, all you need is enough energy to overcome its gravitational binding. But a quark is a tricky thing: as much as we might try, we can never free it from being bound to other quarks (or antiquarks). The reason is tricky, and its explanation won the Nobel Prize exactly 10 years ago. Here’s a great explainer of the physics behind it.

raptinawe
raptinawe:

"For the first time there is observational evidence for merging galaxies that could result in disc galaxies. This is a large and unexpected step towards understanding the mystery of the birth of disc galaxies," — Junko Ueda from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science.
(via Rainbow galaxies reveal why cosmos is full of spirals - New Scientist)

raptinawe:

"For the first time there is observational evidence for merging galaxies that could result in disc galaxies. This is a large and unexpected step towards understanding the mystery of the birth of disc galaxies," — Junko Ueda from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science.

(via Rainbow galaxies reveal why cosmos is full of spirals - New Scientist)

scienceisbeauty
scienceisbeauty:

Princeton University scientists used scanning-tunneling microscope to show the atomic structure of an one-atom-wide iron wire on a lead surface. The zoomed-in portion of the image depicts the quantum probability of the wire containing an elusive particle called the Majorana fermion. Importantly, the image pinpoints the particle to the end of the wire, which is where it had been predicted to be over years of theoretical calculations.
Credit: Yazdani Lab, Princeton University
Source: Majorana fermion: Physicists observe elusive particle that is its own antiparticle (Phys.org)
Paper

scienceisbeauty:

Princeton University scientists used scanning-tunneling microscope to show the atomic structure of an one-atom-wide iron wire on a lead surface. The zoomed-in portion of the image depicts the quantum probability of the wire containing an elusive particle called the Majorana fermion. Importantly, the image pinpoints the particle to the end of the wire, which is where it had been predicted to be over years of theoretical calculations.

Credit: Yazdani Lab, Princeton University

Source: Majorana fermion: Physicists observe elusive particle that is its own antiparticle (Phys.org)

Paper

we-are-star-stuff
we-are-star-stuff:

Breaking down the ingredient ratios of 23 exquisite espresso-based drinks, this chart is a world tour of the purest form of coffee, from the straight-up varieties like the Doppio and Lungo to frothy drinks like the Cappuccino and Latte to less celebrated (yet no less delicious) concoctions such as the Galao and the Cafe Bombon. Happy Coffee Day!

we-are-star-stuff:

Breaking down the ingredient ratios of 23 exquisite espresso-based drinks, this chart is a world tour of the purest form of coffee, from the straight-up varieties like the Doppio and Lungo to frothy drinks like the Cappuccino and Latte to less celebrated (yet no less delicious) concoctions such as the Galao and the Cafe Bombon. Happy Coffee Day!